Urgent Care News

13 July, 2015

Just about everybody does it. Whether it’s googling your symptoms or using an online quiz-type symptom checker on a site like WebMD, hundreds of millions of searches are done every year to try to self-diagnose our symptoms, get advice on whether to seek medical care or just wait until we feel better. But now, a new study led by researches at Harvard Medical School has found that online symptom checkers are more often wrong than they’re right. The first ever study of the accuracy of general-purpose symptom checkers discovered that, although the online programs are often wrong, they are actually roughly no worse than the telephone triage lines commonly used at primary care practices. And they are better than general internet-search self-diagnosis and triage. Senior author Ateev Mehrotra, of Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, said: “These tools may be useful in patients who are trying to decide whether they should go to a doctor quickly, but in many cases, users should be cautious and not take the information they receive from online symptom checkers as gospel.” Frequently, finding the exact correct diagnosis may not be as important as getting the right advice about whether, or how rapidly, to go see a doctor. Click Here for the Entire Article
Reliawire

Courtesy Reliawire News

Want new articles before they get published?
Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

URGENT CARE NEWS

Contrary to Goals
ER Visits Rise under Obamacare

URGENT CARE NEWS
National Urgent Care Awareness Month
URGENT CARE NEWS
ABUCM Acquires NAFAC